JOHN DOBLE

Press & Reviews

Reunion Run

[In Reunion Run] there is much to learn from the struggle of these convincing characters. These friends and lovers are different in outlook and core beliefs and their differences provide the kind of moral ambiguity that sweetens dramatic plots. Their struggle for center and clarity is an extended metaphor for all reunion runs, individual, corporate, and political. Too often the race to enter combat recklessly is accompanied by the knowledge that death is likely to result. Yet we forge ahead exercising our humanity and our hubris. Thanks to playwright John Doble for the unsettling yet necessary reminder.

David Roberts, Theatre Reviews Limited

What works about this play is its ability to showcase post deployment reintegration. Jessica Myhr (Ronnie) portrays an Army officer dealing with post traumatic stress syndrome beautifully.

Mary Beth Smith, NY Theater dot com

Three Blind Dates (previously titled A Serious Person and Then Some)

John Doble's new collection of one-act plays takes on the subject of first dates with only five actors, two chairs, one table, and a handful of props...The three plays are uncommonly thoughtful for one-acts…Doble offers a bold if distinctly un-PC approach to first dates, which will undoubtedly spur conversation.

Zachary Stewart, TheaterMania

These plays are fun, offering unique viewpoints on that scariest of things, the blind date. Writer John Doble deftly avoids anything trite.

Karen D’Onofrio, Electronic Link Journey

A Serious Person “focuses on a blind internet date in which a man must deal with an eccentric and admittedly bipolar airline ticketing agent. Rather than spend time with typical first date small talk, she shares her strange and laughable theories which include speculating that cannibalism is a basic part of human nature… As zany as some of the lines are, the script rings true as an accurate depiction of the ways we fumble for human connection in this era of disconnection.

Adrienne Urbansky, TheEasy.com

Tatyana and the Cable Man “is a smoke break monologue delivered by Russian immigrant Tatyana (Jessica Ayers). She expounds on her love of CNN and a recent series of dates with the guy who installed her cable. Ayers illuminates the story, making it come alive on stage even though she's the only one out there.” 

Zachary Stewart, TheatreMania

Coffee House, Greenwich Village: “The playwright has woven a web of dialogue in which the characters appear by turns to fiercely dominate and then submit to one another through light, impersonal small-talk…a story of Hitchcockian scope.” 

Sloan Rollins, EDGE New York

The Mayor Who Would be Sondheim

Race relations are hardly a novel theme, but it's refreshing to see a play tackle the issue head on. "The Mayor Who Would Be Sondheim," by John Doble, has some striking things to say on the topic.

Mr. Doble has worked in city government and on election campaigns, so the scenarios ring true...

Anne Midgette, The New York Times

It's a sparkling debate and very dramatically compelling to witness. . . .a worthwhile, well-considered, intelligent offering from the Fringe and I was glad to have seen it. [read more. . .]

Margo Channing, BroadwayWorld

A Serious Person

A Serious Person “focuses on a blind internet date in which a man must deal with an eccentric and admittedly bipolar airline ticketing agent. Rather than spend time with typical first date small talk, she shares her strange and laughable theories which include speculating that cannibalism is a basic part of human nature… As zany as some of the lines are, the script rings true as an accurate depiction of the ways we fumble for human connection in this era of disconnection.” 

Adrienne Urbansky, TheEasy.com

Playwright John Doble talks about his new one-act play, A Serious PersonRead the interview on the popular theater blog Call Me Adam.

Adam Rothenberg, Call Me Adam

Hilariously on target! [read more. . .]

Adam Rothenberg, Call Me Adam

Tatyana and the Cable Man

Tatyana and the Cable Man “is a smoke break monologue delivered by Russian immigrant Tatyana (Jessica Ayers). She expounds on her love of CNN and a recent series of dates with the guy who installed her cable. Ayers illuminates the story, making it come alive on stage even though she's the only one out there.” 

Zachary Stewart, TheatreMania

Next up is the hilarious Tatyana and the Cable Man, written by John Doble. On a cigarette break at work, Tatyana, a Russian immigrant to the US, lays out the details of her love-life to a silent co-worker. She's been dating the titular cable man, who initially sounds atrocious - a hard-hearted Fox News watching Republican without an ounce of sympathy. Tatyana explains how she gradually thaws him with a combination of intelligence, culture and good old fashioned socialism.

...If you looked up assertive Russian woman in the dictionary you'd get a picture of Tatyana; yet she's sympathetically and smartly fleshed out in a real person. We laugh along with her, enjoy her company and appreciate her intelligence. The gradual evolution of her confused, quietly infatuated cable man is also fun to hear, a detailed picture building in our minds of his behaviour. This was the best thing I saw all night, the humour perfectly dry and the tone precision nailed down.

William McGeogh, London City Nights

Coffee House, Greenwich Village

The playwright has woven a web of dialogue in which the characters appear by turns to fiercely dominate and then submit to one another through light, impersonal small-talk…a story of Hitchcockian scope.

Sloan Rollins, EDGE New York

"Coffee House, Greenwich Village," by John Doble, opens the second part of the festival. It is an engaging, jarring play with a quite unexpected ending.

Tina Farmer, Station KDHX, St. Louis

Coffee House, Greenwich Village with that as its setting is John Doble’s uproarious black comedy reminiscent of the sensibilities of Elaine May, Jules Feiffer and Christopher Durang.  

Darryl Reilly, TheaterScene.net

Coffee House, Greenwich Village, by John Doble, unravels a tale of intricately complex characters, à la Bonnie and Clyde. 

Sophia Romma, Theater Pizzazz

Lefty and Other Stories

Doble develops personalities through specific details and concrete incidents rather than author commentary. As in the dramatic monologues of Robert Browning, the narrators reveal more than they intend to and often admit to not understanding the motivations behind their actions.


Doble's stories are both serious and accessible. I'm looking forward to reading more from this author and would recommend this book...

Robert P. Holley, MLA Forum

Seven...tender tales of growing up in America. Doble's first collection of short stories presents a number of boy-next-door protagonists trying to wrest their way into adulthood in the face of adversity both common and rare.

The work's shortest piece, "The Accordion's Greatest Hits," which charts the transformation of affection from the budding of new love to the onset of ennui, also proves to be an engrossing tale–understated character development leads readers to ponder the very nature of attraction and consider how the same mysteries of character that initially drew one to a beloved may, if left unsolved, drive one away.

Editor, Kirkus Reviews

To Protect the Poets

To Protect the Poets [is] first-rate, timely and intelligent. Playwright John Doble’s keen sense of dialogue and character development enhances the balanced portrayal of two different points of view.

To Protect the Poets is a remarkable, thought-provoking and important addition which continues this Festival’s [FringeNYC] venerable two-decade tradition of selecting diverse and interesting worthwhile plays. [read more. . .]

Cynthia Allen, TheaterScene

To Protect The Poets is a beautifully written and crafted production that will stay with you days after seeing it. John Doble’s characters are masterfully written. [read more. . .]

Mary-Anne Wright, Theatre is Easy

. . . a taut drama. I couldn’t stop thinking about this play and all the issues it raised. [read more. . .]

Eva Heinemann, Hi!Drama

If you enjoy grappling with moral dilemmas, and if you want to see a modern rendition of Romeo and Juliet then To Protect the Poets may just be what you’re looking for. [read more. . .]

Karen Woodin-Rodríguez, How to Make it as an Actor

Playwright John Doble talks about To Protect the Poets. Read the interview on the popular theater blog Call Me Adam.

Adam Rothenberg, Call Me Adam